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2018 Malheur NF Prescribed Fire

Unit Information

Malheur National Forest
U.S. Forest Service
Oregon
John Day, OR 97845

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Incident Contacts

Malheur National Forest
Email: malheur_public_information@fs.fed.us
Phone: 541-575-3000
Hours: Monday-Friday 8am-4:30pm

John Day Interagency Dispatch Center
Phone: 541-575-1321

Burns Interagency Communication Center
Phone: 541-573-1000

News Releases — 2018 Malheur NF Prescribed Fire

Fire Staff Schedule Prescribed Fire Operations for This Week Released: 9/17/2018
After carefully monitoring conditions across the Forest, fire officials have determined that conditions are within specific parameters, including temperature, relative humidity, fuel moisture to...
Fire Staff and Crews Prepare for 2018 Fall Prescribed Fire Operations Released: 9/12/2018
Malheur National Forest fire officials are monitoring conditions on the Forest and preparing to implement the fall prescribed fire program. Prescribed fires, also known as controlled burns, refer to...
Working around fawning, calving, newborn, and other critters during spring Released: 6/21/2018
Before implementation of prescribed fire, the effects are analyzed through the NEPA process. During this process concerns and issues are identified and appropriate design criteria and mitigation are...
Malheur National Forest Prepares for 2018 Prescribed Burning Released: 4/23/2018
John Day, Prairie City, and Hines, Ore. – The Malheur National Forest is preparing to implement early season prescribed burning activities and planning for late season burning. Spring prescribed...
Fire-Dependent Ecosystem with Periodic Fire Released: 4/9/2018
noscript-98kowhk0ufeacijt4.gif"> Fire can be an important part of maintaining diverse and healthy ecosystems. Here’s why. Over time, litter (mostly in the form of needles, leaves and dead...
Prescribed Fires Released: 4/9/2018
Fire has always been part of the environment, and as one of the most important natural agents of change, fire plays a vital role in maintaining certain ecosystems. Native Americans understood this...