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Mokaac Fire

Unit Information

Arizona Strip Field Office
Bureau of Land Management
Arizona
St.George, AZ 84790

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Wildfire Fact Sheet-Mokaac Fire

Mokaac Fire Wildfire
News – 7/10/2018

Fact SheetBLM Arizona Strip District, ArizonaFor Immediate Release: July 9, 2018Contact: Rachel Carnahan, Public Affairs OfficerPhone: 435-688-3303 or E-mail: rcarnahan@blm.gov

Wildfire Fact Sheet- Mokaac Fire

Start Date: Sunday, July 8, 2018 5:10 p.m. Location: 15 Miles south of St. George, UtahJurisdiction: Arizona Strip Field Office, Bureau of Land ManagementFire Size: Estimated at 2,000 acres. (Note: one acre is equivalent to one football field). Cause: Lightning Closures: No closures at this timeFuels: Short grass, brush Structures: No structures threatened. Fire managers are requesting the public’s assistance by traveling cautiously on the 1069 Quail Road and avoid travel on the 1038 road to allow fire resources to access the fire.Fire Crews/Resources: Local resources on scene are 4 engines, an aerial supervision aircraft (Air Attack), 4sSingle engine air tankers (SEATS), one Type 2 and one Type 3 helicopter, one heavy air tanker. One Type 2 Initial Attack crew is in route. Containment: 20%

Drone use near or over fires is prohibited: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) urge members of the public not to fly “Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)” or drones over or near wildfires. Unauthorized drone flights pose serious risks to firefighter and public safety and the effectiveness of wildfire suppression operations. If an unauthorized drone is detected flying over or near a wildfire, fire managers may have to ground all air tankers, helicopters, and other aerial firefighting aircraft until they can confirm that the drone has left the area. This can cause wildfires to become larger and more costly and unduly threaten lives, property, and valuable natural and cultural resources. Aerial firefighting aircraft, such as air tankers and helicopters, fly at very low altitudes, typically just a couple of hundred feet above the ground and in the same airspace as drones flown by the public. This creates the potential for a mid-air collision, or a pilot distraction that results in a crash, that could seriously injure or kill aerial and/or ground firefighters. To keep drone pilots aware of flight restrictions, the FAA has developed an easy-to-use smartphone app called B4UFLY. The app helps drone pilots determine whether there are any restrictions or requirements in effect at the location where they want to fly. B4UFLY is available for free download in the App Store for iOS and Google Play store for Android. Additional information is available at https://www.faa.gov/uas/where_to_fly/b4ufly/

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