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Klondike Fire

Unit Information

Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest
U.S. Forest Service
3040 Biddle Rd.
Medford, OR 97504

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Incident Contact

Klondike Fire Information
Phone: 541-618-2113
Hours: 7 AM to 8 PM Daily

Highlighted Activity

11/03/2018 11/03/18 Klondike Fire Update
After a very long fire season, the management of the Klondike Fire is being returned to a local Type 4 management organization Monday morning. Patrols will be ongoing in the Agness area. Repairs and..
News - 11/03/2018
11/03/18 Klondike Fire MapImage options: [ Full Size ]

The Klondike Fire is burning in the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest. The fire started on July 15 from a lightning strike in the area of Klondike Creek about 9 miles southwest of Selma, OR.

The Klondike West fire is actively burning in the footprint of the 2002 Biscuit Fire and in the Kalmiopsis Wilderness. Portions of the fire are contained by previously burned areas including the Chetco Bar Fire of 2017.

The Taylor Creek and Klondike Fires were split into zones on Saturday, Aug. 18. The fires are now referred to as Taylor Creek Fire, Klondike Fire East, and Klondike Fire West.

Online Links

InciWeb: Taylor Creek Fire

InciWeb: Klondike Fire

Evacuation levels: http://bit.ly/joco-evac

Facebook: Taylor Creek & Klondike Fires

Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest

Basic Information

Current as of
Incident TypeWildfire
CauseLightning/natural
Date of OriginSunday July 15th, 2018 approx. 10:45 PM
Location9 miles northwest of Selma, OR
Incident CommanderHoward McGuire
Coordinates42.369 latitude, -123.86 longitude

Current Situation

Total Personnel185
Size175,258 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained90%
Estimated Containment DateWednesday October 31st, 2018 approx. 12:00 AM
Fuels Involved

Timber (Litter and Understory)

Timber (Grass and Understory)

Brush (2 feet)

Mixed conifer and hardwood timber stands interspersed with brush patches. Abundant snags and jackpots of heavy fuels.

Significant Events

Fire activity consisted of continued smoldering and consumption of heavy fuels like logs and stumps.

Outlook

Planned Actions

Resources will focus on suppression repair and back haul of equipment.

Suppression repair will continue as opportunities and personnel are available. As of 1600 this evening 50% of assessed repair work on points such as drop points, heli-spots, heli-bases, and spike camps has been completed, as well as the repair of 61% of assessed fire line including hand line and dozer line as well as 89% of roads needing repair have been completed.

Projected Incident Activity

12 hours:

No growth is expected through the period. Heavy fuels like logs and stumps will continue to smolder. Minimal smoke production will occur.

24 hours:

No growth is expected through the period. Heavy fuels like logs and stumps will continue to smolder. Minimal smoke production will occur

48 hours:

No growth is expected through the period. Heavy fuels like logs and stumps will continue to smolder. Minimal smoke production will occur

72 hours:

Even with drier weather forecasted relative humidity remains elevated and minimal fire behavior is expected as fuels remain moist.

Anticipated after 72 hours:

Near the end of the drying trend, there is low potential to see some creep in pockets of unburned fuel.

Remarks

Current Weather

Weather Concerns

Friday, Nov. 2: Precipitation occurred across much of the fire today with amounts ranging from 0.02" to over 0.10." Winds were generally light out of the SW.

Saturday, Nov. 3: High pressure will move across SW Oregon in between frontal systems Saturday, and likely to bring the RH as low as 30% for some portions of the fire throughout the day. Winds are not expected to be strong.

Sunday, Nov. 4: Rain is likely across the fire area with rainfall amounts in excess of .25 inches. Winds will be gusty out of SW up to 25 MPH on the ridgetops.

Looking forward: Cool offshore flow is likely to develop for much of the next week, bringing drier conditions. However, low November sun angles and persistent valley inversions will confine the driest conditions to the highest peaks and ridges.