Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Here's how you know

Single Publication

Zoom to your location
Reset map zoom and position

Could not determine your location.

Boulder Mountain Fire

Share this incident

Unit Information

Washington 
Colville, 
99114 
Washington 
Colville, 
99114 

Incident Contacts

  • Boulder Mountain Fire Information
    Email:
    2022.bouldermountain@firenet.gov
    Phone:
    509-508-3389
    Hours:
    8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Boulder Mountain Fire update for Monday, Sept. 26

Boulder Mountain Fire
News - 09/26/2022

CUSICK, Wash. – Firefighters have suppressed the Boulder Mountain Fire to 99% containment and have kept the fire footprint as small as possible.   

“We want to thank the Kalispel Tribe and the communities of Cusick and Usk for their hospitality and support,” said Northwest 13 Incident Commander Brian Gales. “The Tribe graciously allowed us to use their homelands and Pow Wow Grounds for our incident command post throughout this incident. Local residents and businesses have also made us feel very welcome.”   Today is the final operational shift for Northwest IMT 13. Washington Department of Natural Resources and Colville National Forest will take control of the fire Tuesday morning. For future information about the Boulder Mountain Fire, go to https://www.fs.usda.gov/colville or https://www.facebook.com/colvillenf.  The Colville National Forest has lifted a closure enacted for the duration of the fire, however, many natural hazards can exist for months – if not years – after a fire is out:  
  • Dead or dying trees that remain standing after a wildfire are unstable, especially in high winds. 
  • Burned out stumps and root systems can create pits that may also be camouflaged by ash or debris. They can also weaken the soil, making it subject to collapse. Stepping or falling into one could break a bone. They may also contain hot embers that can cause severe burns.  
  • Ash and fallen needles are slippery and can make for treacherous footing on trails.  
  • Unstable soils and areas stripped of vegetation can result in falling rocks or logs and landslides in dry weather, or debris flows and flash floods in rainy weather. 
="text-indent:-.25in;mso-list:l0>="margin-bottom:10.0pt;mso-add-space:>="text-indent:-.25in;mso-list:l0>="text-indent:-.25in;mso-list:l0>="margin-bottom:8.0pt">="margin-bottom:8.0pt">="margin-bottom:8.0pt">
="margin:>
="margin:>
="margin:>
="margin:>
="margin:>